Affiliated Faculty

 

GLEI partners with faculty across Case Western Reserve University to promote energy-related research on campus. Through their research the following faculty work to catalyze breakthroughs and improve understanding of the way energy is harvested, distributed and used. 

Platforms

Future Power Energy Storage Solar Power Wind Oil & Gas

 

Marija Prica

Steve Hostler

Pan Li

Yue Li

Kenneth Loparo

Soumyajit Mandal

Chirag Kharangate

Brian Maxwell

Genevieve Sauvé

 

 

Rohan Akolkar

Liming Dai

Burcu Gurkan

​Vikas Prakash

Julie Renner

Robert Savinell

Alp Sehirlioglu

Chris Yuan

 

Roger French

Clemens Burda

Ina Martin

Xuan Gao

Laura Bruckman

Jennifer Carter

 

Xiong (Bill) Yu

 

 

Rigoberto Advincula

YeongAe Heo

 

 

 

Cross-Cutting Energy Research

 

Christine Duval

Jonathan Adler

Mike Hore

Peter Yang

Shulei Zhang

 


FUTURE POWER


Maya (Marija) Prica

Professor Prica's research interests include distribution power system modeling, operation, planning and protection; smart grid and microgrid design, operation and protection; integration of advanced technologies and control; decision-making for future electricity systems; and optimization of energy storage operation.  

email: mxp438@case.edu

 

 

 


Steve Hostler

Professor Hostler's primary work is in the characterization of novel thermal materials. He is currently developing a class of materials that can be switched from thermally conducting to thermally insulating (and back) on demand. Prior to returning to Case, Dr. Hostler worked for waste heat recovery startup Echogen Power Systems. There he designed, built, and tested heat engines that use CO2 as the working fluid. His future research interests include unique approaches to energy conversion and utilization. Examples include CO2-based absorption heat pumps, non-aqueous hydraulic fracturing fluids, and cavitation-induced combustion.

email: srh6@case.edu

 

 


Pan Li

Professor Pan Li investigates security, privacy, and the optimization in energy systems. In particular, he addresses the cybersecurity issues in the smart grids, privacy concerns in energy management, energy theft detection, and economic activities in power systems, and system optimization including dynamic loading scheduling, and state estimation.

email: pxl288@case.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 


Yue Li

Natural hazards such as hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes pose a significant risk to energy infrastructure such as electric power plants, electric transmission and distribution systems, oil refineries, gas distribution systems, and petroleum terminals. Additionally, DOE has cautioned that climate change could restrict the supply of secure, sustainable, and affordable energy critical to the nation's economic growth. Natural hazards cause considerable physical damage to energy infrastructure which is expected to increase due to the impact of climate change. As such, a framework for risk assessment of energy infrastructure subjected to natural hazards is required which will ultimately form the basis for damage reduction which will lead to a more resilient energy infrastructure. Our current research involves developing a framework for risk-based assessment and strengthening of electric power systems subjected to natural hazards. Specific areas covered thus far include probabilistic seismic risk assessment and design of nuclear power plants, risk assessment of electric power transmission and distribution systems subjected to hurricanes and earthquakes, as well as the combined effect of both. Various risk mitigation strategies were proposed; their efficiency and cost-effectiveness assessed. Aging of energy infrastructure components has also been considered in the risk assessment as it has been determined to be one of the main issues facing the energy sector. Furthermore, the potential impact of climate change on intensity and frequency of future hurricanes and tropical storms has been investigated. Various adaption strategies were proposed and their cost-effectiveness investigated. Future research will focus on the impact of other natural hazards such as tsunamis, floods, ice storms, and tornadoes on energy infrastructure. Other sectors of the energy infrastructure such as power plants, oil refineries, gas distribution systems, and petroleum terminals will also be considered. In the area of climate change, other climate trends such as decreasing water availability for power generation and sea level rise will be incorporated into the research. The ultimate objective of the research is to develop a comprehensive decision support framework that will guide stakeholders to make risk-informed decisions regarding reliability and resilience of energy infrastructure systems as well as prioritize investment in risk mitigation and climate change adaption strategies. This requires an interdisciplinary approach and we work with researchers from electrical engineering, climate science, and social sciences to develop the required framework.

email: yxl566@case.edu


Kenneth Loparo

Professor Loparo was assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cleveland State University from 1977 to 1979 and he has been on the faculty of the Case School of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University since 1979. He is the Nord Professor of Engineering and Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and holds academic appointments in the departments of biomedical engineering and mechanical and aerospace engineering in the Case School of Engineering. He has received numerous awards including the Sigma Xi Research Award for contributions to stochastic control, the John S. Diekoff Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching, the Tau Beta Pi Outstanding Engineering and Science Professor Award, the Undergraduate Teaching Excellence Award, the Carl F. Wittke Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching, and the Srinivasa P. Gutti Memorial Engineering Teaching Award. He was chair of the Department of Systems Engineering from 1990 -1993 and associate dean of engineering from 1993 -1997.

Loparo is a Life Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of AIMBE, his research interests include stability and control of nonlinear and stochastic systems with applications to large-scale electricity systems including generation, transmission and distribution; nonlinear filtering with applications to monitoring, fault detection, diagnosis, prognosis and reconfigurable control; information theory aspects of stochastic and quantized systems with applications to adaptive and dual control and the design of distributed autonomous control systems; the development of advanced signal processing and data analytics for monitoring and tracking of physiological behavior in health and disease.

email: kal4@case.edu


Soumyajit Mandal

Soumyajit Mandal is an Assistant Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department, where he leads the Integrated Circuits and Sensor Physics research group. His energy-related research interests include all aspects of energy-efficient sensor and sensor interface design. Current projects include self-powered temperature and vibration monitoring for smart buildings and electrical distribution networks, acoustically-coupled wireless sensors for monitoring batteries and fuel cells, and highly-reliable high-temperature sensing and control circuits for power electronics systems.

 

email: sxm833@case.edu

 


Chirag Kharangate

Professor Kharangate is leading the Two-Phase Thermal Management Laboratory in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). Dr. Kharangate received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University in 2016 and has multiple years of research and industry experience working on projects dealing with thermal management technologies utilizing single-phase and two-phase flows for automotive, computer, and aerospace applications. He has extensive expertise testing and modeling flow boiling, flow condensation and evaporation phase change schemes. His research interests include developing energy efficient technologies, thermal management, turbulence and CFD.

email: crk91@case.edu


Brian Maxwell

Professor Maxwell is a turbulent combustion and detonation expert in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. Brian received his Ph.D. at the University of Ottawa, in 2016, for his novel research on developing turbulent combustion modelling strategies for explosion and detonation hazards involving gaseous fuels. More recently, until 2018, Brian continued his work, as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Victoria, on modelling fuel safety hazards involving hydrogen leaks from pipelines. At Case Western, Brian is continuing his work on detonation and turbulent combustion research, using the latest computer models, to better understand explosion hazards in the context of fuel safety. Brian is also using his expertise to advance research in the field of next-generation propulsion involving gaseous fuels.

email: brian.maxwell@case.edu


Genevieve Sauvé

Prof. Sauvé obtained her PhD at the California Institute of Technology in 1999, studying dye sensitized solar cells with Prof. Nathan S. Lewis. She then spent some time at PPG Industries as a senior development chemist. In 2002, she joined Prof. Richard D. McCullough’s group at Carnegie Mellon University as a postdoctoral fellow, and worked on conjugated polymers for field-effect transistors. In 2008, Sauvé spent a year in Germany, when she collaborated with physicists on organic solar cells. In August of 2009, Sauvé joined the chemistry department at Case Western Reserve University and was promoted to Associate Professor of Chemistry with Tenure in 2015. Her group has been designing and synthesizing new conjugated molecules and polymers for opto-electronic applications and studying their structure-property relationship. Current projects include developing alternative acceptors for organic solar cells and organic semiconductors with high dielectric constant for the next generation of photovoltaics.

email: gxs244@case.edu


ENERGY STORAGE


Rohan Akolkar

Professor Akolkar is presently the F. Alex Nason Associate Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. At Case, he is also the Ohio Eminent Scholar in Advanced Energy Research, the Associate Director of Electronics Design Center and the Faculty Director of Ohio’s Center of Excellence on Energy Storage. Professor Akolkar’s research spans many different areas of electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering, including electrodeposition, electrometallurgy, and electrochemical materials development for applications in nano-electronics, batteries, and extraction or refining of metals. His notable research contributions include: (i) a novel electrochemical atomic layer deposition and etching process for fabricating atomic-scale materials with unprecedented control over morphology and composition; (ii) the development and fundamental understanding of electroplating chemistries used to fabricate nano-scale interconnects used worldwide in microprocessors and memory devices; and (iii) a novel electrowinning process for low-cost extraction of titanium metal powder from its ore for lightweighting applications. His research has been recognized by the Case School of Engineering Research Award (2016), the Norman Hackerman Young Author Award of the Electrochemical Society (2004), and numerous industry awards and patents during his 8-year tenure (2005-2012) in R&D at Intel Corporation. His research has been supported by federal and industrial funding agencies including DOE ARPA-E, NSF, State of Ohio, Atotech, Medtronic and Lam Research Corporation. Professor Akolkar holds memberships of reputed professional societies including the Electrochemical Society, the International Society of Electrochemistry, the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, and the American Vacuum Society. Professor Akolkar has delivered numerous invited lectures at universities and industries all around the world, and has co-instructed tutorials and summer schools on electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering in Europe and Asia. Professor Akolkar holds Ph.D. (2004) in Chemical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and a Bachelor of Chemical Engineering degree (2001) from the Institute of Chemical Technology in Mumbai, India.

Dr. Akolkar is the Deputy Director of the DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC), Breakthrough Electrolytes for Energy Storage (BEES), at CWRU. 

email: rohan.akolkar@case.edu


Liming Dai

Professor Dai joined Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) in fall 2009 as the Kent Hale Smith Professor in the Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering. He is also director of the Center of Advanced Science and Engineering for Carbon (CASE4Carbon). Dr. Dai's expertise covers the synthesis, functionalization, and device fabrication of conjugated polymers and carbon nanomaterials for energy-related and biomedical applications. He has published more than 400 scientific papers, and held about 30 issued/applied patents. He has also published a research monograph on intelligent macromolecules (Springer), an edited book on carbon nanotechnology (Elsevier), a co-edited book on carbon nanomaterials for advanced energy systems (Wiley), and another co-edited book on carbon nanomaterials for biomedical applications (Springer). Dr. Dai serves as an Associate Editor of Nano Energy (Elsevier) and editorial board member of several international journals. He is a Highly Cited Researcher (Thomson Reuters). He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

email: liming.dai@case.edu


Burcu Gurkan

Professor Gurkan's research focuses on the design of nonflammable electrolytes based on ionic liquids and highly porous materials for energy storage and conversion, with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the electrode-electrolyte interactions. Ionic liquids are salts at liquid state and they have unique properties such as wide electrochemical window, non flammability, negligible volatility and wide liquidus range which are promising for battery and supercapacitor applications. Her group employs computational and experimental tools to understand the underlying physical and electrochemical phenomena at interfaces involving ionic liquids.

Dr. Gurkan is the Research Integration Officer and Thrust 1 lead for the DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC), Breakthrough Electrolytes for Energy Storage (BEES), at CWRU. 

email: beg23@case.edu


Vikas Prakash

Professor Prakash received his PhD in Engineering from Brown University in 1993.  He joined the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the Case Western Reserve University in January 1993 as the Warren E. Rupp Assistant Professor of Science and Engineering, and attained the rank of Professor in 2004.

Over the years he has made use of his knowledge of engineering mechanics to work on fundamental problems related to dynamic shock compression of solids; dynamic strength and failure of ductile and brittle materials under intense stress wave loading; dynamic frictional slip at material interfaces under extreme conditions; slip-weakening and rupture of earth crustal faults; and design and fabrication of 1D, 2D and 3D hybrid carbon-nanomaterial networks with applications to thermal energy management and electrochemical energy storage.  A more recent focus of his work has been on understanding the dynamic strength of technologically important metals as they transition through melt at ultra-high plastic strain rates under extreme thermo-mechanical loading conditions.  The project is supported by DOE’s NNSA program and has applications to national security.  A second thrust of his current research is the design and development of high performance and safe multifunctional structural “building blocks” with integrated energy storage capabilities that can provide both mass and volume savings to aero- and space-vehicles, thereby extending their range and endurance during flight.  This project is in collaboration with researchers at NASA GRC, WPAFB, and industry.  A parallel thrust of his research in energy is on the development of innovative integrated energy storage technologies that provide new opportunities to link thermal energy storage and electrochemical energy storage. These new integrated energy storage technologies have the potential to change the way we currently power our grids, homes, buildings, vehicles, and industry, enabling higher operational efficiencies and shift to a low-carbon future.  Dr. Prakash is an author of 185 technical publications.  He is a Fellow of the ASME. During 2011-12 he served as the Chair of the ASME Materials Division, and as the Chair of the ASME Nanotechnology Institute from 2010-14.  He has served on the Editorial Board of the international journal of Experimental Mechanics as an Associate Technical Editor and currently serves on the Review Editorial Board of Frontiers in Nano-energy Technologies and Materials, Nature Publishing Group.  He has been an invited participant to the 2006 Frontiers of Engineering Symposium organized by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), Irvine, CA; 2013 National Academy of Engineering Global Grand Challenges Summit, London, UK, organized by the US NAE, UK Royal Academy of Engineering, and the Chinese Academy of Engineering; and the 2013 National Academies Keck Futures Initiative (NAKFI) on Energy, organized jointly by the US NAS, NAE, and IOM. Over the years, the sponsors of his research have been the NSF, DOE, ONR, DARPA, NASA, ARO, ARL, AFOSR, AFRL (WPAFB and Eglin), USDA, USGS, Ohio Board of Regents (OBR), and OFRN.

email: vikas.prakash@case.edu


Julie Renner

The central aim of the Renner Research Laboratory is to develop protein engineered materials for use in and study of electrochemical systems. Protein engineering is a uniquely powerful tool, which harnesses the complexity and specificity of proteins found in nature. By taking advantage of the ability to precisely define protein sequences, a new generation of materials are being created for energy and water applications.

Energy-related projects include:

1) Electrochemical ammonia production

2) Enzyme-based electrodes

3) Controlling membrane electrode assembly (MEA) architecture

Water projects include:

1) Nitrogen and phosphorous recycling strategies

2) Sensors for toxic water contaminants

3) Nitrate remediation

email: jxr484@case.edu


Robert Savinell 

Professor Savinell’s research interest has been directed at fundamental engineering and mechanistic issues of electrochemical systems/device design, development, and optimization.  He applies mathematical and experimental techniques to achieve an understanding of the interactions among kinetics, thermodynamics and transport processes at interfaces within electrochemical systems.  The technologies he has worked on include batteries, sensors, chlor-alkali synthesis, bromine recovery, wastewater treatment, high surface area electrode applications, fuel cells of several types, electrochemical capacitors, and electrolysis cells of various types. Professor Savinell is the co-inventor of PBI/H3PO4 high temperature proton conducting membrane for fuel cells and other electrochemical applications.  In recent years he has focused his efforts on chemistries, materials and designs for flow batteries for large scale energy storage.  He has patents and pending patents on several flow battery chemistries, and components for flow battery performance enhancements.  He has demonstrated concept of the all-iron flow battery system with a slurry electrode that allows designs that decouple power capacity from energy capacity in scaling the flow battery for large applications.  His research is now in the translational mode and is working with commercialization partners along with through ARPA-E funding.  Professor Savinell also has research on materials, fabrication,  and degradation processes of electrochemical capacitors.

Professor Savinell is an elected Fellow of the Electrochemical Society, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the International Society of Electrochemistry.  He is the current Editor of the Journal of the Electrochemical Society.

Dr. Savinell is the Director of the DOE Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC), Breakthrough Electrolytes for Energy Storage (BEES), at CWRU. 

email: rfs2@case.edu


Alp Sehirlioglu

Professor Sehirlioglu's interests include electronic ceramics with a focus on extreme environments. His research involves bulk piezoelectrics and thermoelectrics, and hetero-interfaces with unique 2D behavior. As an experimentalist, his approach incorporates materials chemistry, microstructural engineering and the resulting multi-scale structure - property relationships. He employs solid state processing, solidification, mechanochemical alloying and pulse laser deposition techniques to develop materials. The characterization techniques that are available in his labs include several impedance analyzers, signal generators and ferroelectric/piezoelectric analyzers that allow electrical, thermoelectric and electromechanical characterization as a function of temperature, frequency, electric field, atmosphere and stress. His current activity is on (i) high temperature perovskite based ferroelectric-piezoelectrics and their depoling characteristics, (ii) two dimensional electron gas formation at oxide hetero-interfaces and the effects of local structure and composition around the interface, (iii) high temperature silicide based thermoelectrics, and (iv) enhanced cation conductivity both in bulk as a part of structural batteries and at interfaces as a part of miniaturization efforts in solid state electrolytes.

email: axs461@case.edu


Chris Yuan

Professor Yuan is currently an Associate Professor in Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. His research interests are in lithium ion batteries and industrial energy efficiency. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Career Award in 2014, the State of Wisconsin "Citation of Commendation" Award in 2014, The Gustav Olling Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) in 2013, and the LEO Best Paper Award from the 2013 CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2009, his M.S., in Industrial Engineering from Texas Tech University in 2005, and his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from China University of Petroleum in 1999.

email: chris.yuan@case.edu


SOLAR POWER


Roger French

Professor French's research group of more than 20 students and associates uses vacuum ultraviolet and optical spectroscopies, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and computational optics to study optical properties, electronic structure, and radiation durability of optical materials, polymers, ceramics, and liquids. His group is also developing a Hadoop2-based distributed computing environment for data science and analytics of complex systems. This allows multi-factor real world performance to be integrated with lab-based experimental datasets to, for example, identify degradation mechanisms and pathways active over a technology's lifetime. These approaches have a commonality in network modeling, using structural equation, and graph-based models for large-scale global systems such as photovoltaic (PV) power plans and buildings. 

Lifetime and degradation science (L&DS) looks at long-lived environmentally-exposed materials, components and systems such as PV technologies and energy-efficient lighting, roofing, building exteriors and more. The Solar Durability and Lifetime Extension (SDLE) center uses data science and analytics methods for a broad range of energy and materials projects, including a DOE-ARPA-E funded building energy efficiency project and a DOE-NETL funded Rapid Alloy Quantification project. 

email: roger.french@case.edu


Clemens Burda

Professor Burda's spectroscopic research targets the photophysical nature of nanomaterials with energy application. He studied the energy transport and charge separation properties in quantum dots, nanowires, and at type-II semiconductor interfaces. In recent years, he also focused on 2-dimensional metal-halide based perovskites, which have had a major impact on the field of photovoltaics with device efficiencies reaching up to 20.1%. Perovskites have been the focus of much research due to their performance as photosensitizers for solar energy conversion applications. By studying the photophysical properties of these sensitizers, valuable information about the charge carrier relaxation processes is gained and insight into charge transfer and recombination processes that occur within the sensitizer material and its interfaces after photosensitization. In the Burda group, the photophysics of photactive structures will be studied with femtosecond time resolution and the charge carrier dynamics of nanomaterials or films will be investigated with a broad array of optical spectroscopic techniques. For example, the role of the cation, methylammonium, within the perovskite lattive and the implications on device efficiencies are being studied.

email: burda@case.edu


Ina Martin

Professor Martin is the operations director of the Materials for Opto/electronics Research and Education (MORE) Center, an optoelectronic materials core facility with a research and educational scope that spans science and engineering departments. Additionally, she has developed research projects and collaborations that focus on understanding and controlling the chemistry of thin film processing in optoelectronic and electronic applications. This includes the use of self-assembled monolayers to tune local electronic and bonding properties to enhance performance, cost, and/or stability. She has applied interfacial modifies to the problem of mitigating transparent conductive oxide (TCO) degradation. This has led to the development TCO modification protocols to understand and control the undesired chemical reactions that are associated with metastability in the context of optoelectronic applications. Other recent work includes the synthesis of thin film perovskites using vacuum techniques and wet chemistry, to study degradation of the material and seek substitute materials and chemistries. In collaboration with Momentive Performance Materials Inc., and the Department of Chemical Engineering, she worked on thermal pyrolytic graphite deposition and characterization for thermal management applications, e.g., aerospace and solid-state lighting.

email: ixm98@case.edu


Xuan Gao

Professor Gao's group works on the fundamental understanding of energy conversion and transport processes in materials or devices important for energy harvesting technologies such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Through investigating how energy is converted and transported by different carriers (electron, phonons, photons) in solid state materials at nanoscale, we hope to find insights and strategies for designing advanced materials with high efficiency in thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy conversion. The current materials of interest include semiconductor nanomaterials (nanowires, graphene-like two-dimensional nano-sheets) and metal-organic halid perovskites.

email: xuan.gao@case.edu


Laura Bruckman

Laura S. Bruckman is an Associate Research Professor in Materials Science and Engineering. Her research is focused on a data science approach to material degradation. She is an expert on quantitative spectroscopic techniques and image analysis to understand material degradation in relation to particular stresses. A material data science approach using statistical analytics is used to develop <stress|mechanism|response> pathway (netSEM models) diagrams for material systems. These pathway diagrams elucidate the impact of materials and stressors  and their relationship to overall degradation and lifetime performance loss. By encompassing data from both in use  and accelerated experiments of the degradation of materials, lifetime predictions can be made for material systems under a wide variety of use conditions.  Her area of focus has been on solar packaging materials, building envelope materials, and coatings.

email: lsh41@case.edu


Jennifer Carter

Professor Carter is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering who heads the Mesoscale Science Lab group. The group focuses on developing and implementing novel multi-scale methods to correlate unique microstructural features with certain mechanical and environmental characteristics in various material systems. This research will drive a physical understanding of processing-structure-property relationships of crystalline and amorphous materials and develop innovative techniques to guide, inform, and validate physics-based comptation models describing material behavior. Her research interests also encompass advancement and implementation of data analytics and machine learning towards a variety of materials engineering challenges such as mechanical behavior of materials, digital image correlation for deformation analysis, x-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, and interface effects.

email: jwc137@case.edu


WIND


Xiong (Bill) Yu

Professor Yu is the Frank H. Neff Professor of Civil Engineering and the Interim Civil Engineering Department Chair. Examples of his energy- related research include:

1. Design, processing, and operation of energy efficient innovative materials, buildings, and infrastructure

2. Smart wind turbine technology for wind energy

3. Earth dam and concrete dam design for hydropower

4. Energy harvesting from ambient environment (thermoelectric, microbial, piezoelectric, wave, etc...)

5. Geothermal system design and analyses

6. Sensor and technologies for health monitoring and control

7. Renewable energy application for highway infrastructure and transportation

8. Rock mechanics, rock characterization and geophysics for shale energy exploration

email: xxy21@case.edu


OIL & GAS


Rigoberto Advincula

The PETRO Case and Advincula Research Group (ARG) focuses on challenging problems and high value adding in the Oil & Gas and Energy industries. In particular, the use of high performance chemical additives, polymers, and coatings for specific upstream to downstream performance requirements and their stress testing. This focus includes materials for high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) environments. The use of new synthesis and fabrication strategies along with novel testing methods is what differentiates our work from other oil & gas consortia. Opportunities for shale oil and gas and geothermal projects abound. Current projects include: 1) proppant resin research and development, 2) 3-D Printing with high performance polymers and nanocomposites, 3) Flow assurance studies with polymeric chemical inhibitors, 4) Smart and high performance protective coatings for anti-corrosion and anti-scaling, 5) Flow testing and permeability studies under high pressure and high temperature studies, 6) Corrosion mechanism and long-term stability testing, and 7) Smart Fluids and rheological modifiers. The group works with GLEI to provide the chemical and materials solutions for the energy industries and collaborative research.

email: rca41@case.edu


YeongAe Heo

The ultimate research goal of Professor Heo's MHS-DRISK (Multi Hazard and multi Scale structural Dynamics and Risk research) Lab is to identify resilient structural clusters in complex systems against various types of potential hazards based on probabilistic methodologies. Structural cluster includes energy production facilities and urban communities where houses, buildings and infrastructure are organically linked. Dr. Heo received her Ph.D in Civil and Environmental Engineering from University of California, Davis in 2009. Dr. Heo has expertise in modeling and simulation of nonlinear dynamic performance at different structural levels such as material, member and system level; and probabilistic hazard and risk assessment including hazard characterization for natural and man-made events (e.g. earthquake, explosion, fire, dropped object impact, collision, etc.) in both Civil and Offshore Engineering fields. Dr. Heo was formally a senior researcher in the Offshore Technology R&D Division at Samsung Heavy Industries from 2010 until she joined the Department of Civil Engineering at Case Western Reserve University as Assistant Professor in August 2014. Dr. Heo has contributed to advances in hazard and risk mitigation for offshore energy production systems collaborating with world-class oil companies and research institutions such as Shell Corporation, and GexCon AS, Norway. Please visit MHS-DRISK Lab webpage to find more details about Dr. Heo's research interests.

email: yaheo@case.edu


Cross-Cutting Energy Research


Christine Duval

Professor Duval is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. She joined the department in 2017 after an appointment as a DOE Scholar at the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials Information Program. The Duval Laboratory focuses on the synthesis of advanced separation materials (resins and membranes) with applications in medical isotope production, radiation detection, nuclear forensics and environmental remediation. Our group has expertise in polymer synthesis as well as surface modification techniques that allow us to tailor the surface chemistry to a specific need. Fundamentally, we are interested in how the molecular-level design of materials can translate into improved separation properties such as selectivity and productivity.

email: ced84@case.edu


Jonathan Adler

Professor Adler is the inaugural Johan Verheij Memorial Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Business Law & Regulation at the Case Western Reserve University School of Law, where he teaches courses in environmental, administrative and constitutional law. Professor Adler is the author or editor of seven books and over a dozen book chapters. His articles have appeared in publications ranging from the Harvard Environmental Law Review and Supreme Court Economic Review to The Wall Street Journal and USA Today. He has testified before Congress a dozen times, and his work has been cited in the U.S. Supreme Court. A 2016 study identified Professor Adler as the most-cited legal academic in administrative and environmental law under age 50. Professor Adler is a senior fellow at the Property & Environment Research Center in Bozeman, Montana and at the Center for the Study of the Administrative Slate at the George Mason University School of Law. Professor Adler's research includes work federal-state relations in environmental and energy policy and non-regulatory approaches to environmental protection. Recent papers include "Climate Balkanization: Dormant Commerce and the Limits of State Energy Policy," 3 LSU Journal of Energy Law & Resources 153 (2014) and "Eyes on a Climate Prize: Rewarding Energy Innovation to Achieve Climate Stabilization," 35 Harvard Environmental Law Review 1 (2011), and "Heat Expands All Things: The Proliferation of Greenhouse Gas Regulation under the Obama Administration," 34 Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy 421 (2011).

email: jha5@case.edu


Mike Hore 

Professor Hore’s research interests combine experiments with theory and simulation to understand polymer physics problems involving grafted and non-linear polymers. Computational techniques  used include dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, polymer field theories such as self-consistent field theory (SCFT), and Monte Carlo simulations. Experimentally,  a wide range of techniques are used to investigate polymer systems, including ionic conductivity measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), massively-parallel phase analysis light scattering (MP-PALS), multi-angle (static) light scattering (MALS), and a variety of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering techniques. Particular topics he is interested in include translocation processes, cononsolvency in thermoresponsive systems, and the structure/dynamics of grafted polymers.

email: hore@case.edu


Peter Yang

Professor Yang's energy related research is focused on the renewable energy and energy efficiency in major economies as sustainable development solutions to today's environmental and ecological challenges of the global economy. The research projects he has completed include environmental and ecological impact of carbon based energy production and consumption; renewable energy promotion policies, and legislations, and regulations, such as feed-in tariffs, fuel taxes and carbon tax, renewable energy targets, CO2 reduction targets: investment, installation and consumption of renewable energy technologies. These projects resulted in two books, Rolling Back the Tide of Climate Change: Renewable Solutions and Policy Instruments in the USA and China (2015) and Renewables Are Getting Cheaper (2016), and a number of peer reviewed journal papers, book chapters, book reviews, and conference papers. His current energy related research interest includes the following areas: research and development of renewable energy technologies; advantages and challenges of renewable energy technologies, grid integration and energy storage; energy efficiency in transportation and buildings; and teaching, training, and public education of renewable energy transformation.

email: pjy2@case.edu


Shulei Zhang 

Professor Zhang is an assistant professor in the Physics department. Since receiving his PhD from the University of Arizona in 2014, Zhang is actively studying theoretical condensed matter physics. His research interests consist primarily of the physics of magnetic and quantum materials as well as their applications to electronic devices.

Zhang's various appointments include a Postdoc Fellowship at the University of Missouri (9/15-3/17), a Postdoc Appointment in the Materials Science Division of Argonne National Lab (4/17-6/19), and is currently appointed as an Assistant Professor at CWRU (7/19-Present).

email: shulei.zhang@case.edu